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Good Ghost Haunting

Shag and Scoob trick Witch Hunter

Good Ghost Haunting title card

Description
Part of Scooby-Doo! #42
# of pages 12
Writer Brett Lewis
Penciler Anthony Williams
Inker Dan Davis
Colorer Paul Becton
Letterer Ryan Cline
Chronology
Previous story

Dig Them Bones

Next story

Nutcracker Not-So-Sweet


Good Ghost Haunting is the second and final story in Scooby-Doo! #42, by DC Comics. It was preceded by Dig Them Bones.

Premise

The gang faces a Witch Hunter.

Synopsis

Insert details here.

Characters

Main characters:

Supporting characters:

Villains:

Other characters:

  • Scientists (single appearance)(no lines)
  • Police officer 1 (single appearance)
  • Police officer 2 (single appearance)(no lines)

Locations

Objects

  • TBA

Vehicles

Suspects

Suspect Motive/reason
Janitor Claimed that he created the hologram technology and that all the other contestants are frauds.

Culprits

Culprit Motive/reason
Student as the Witch Hunter
Professor Mervis
To steal equipment from the technology fair.

Notes/trivia

  • TBA

Reprints

Reception

Brett Lewis proves his Scoob chops with a twist to the old hologram use. The cleverness does not stop there. Mr. Lewis appoints a Witch Hunter as his ghost of the night. This seating I found particularly apropos given the nature of the witches hung at Salem and other shires. Generally speaking, witches practiced a primitive form of science. They were herb women who alleviated pains with the chemicals found in plants. The hunt for witches wasn't so much a rail against the occult but a particularly nasty pre-luddite rebellion that promoted superstition. The idea of a Witch Hunter sabotaging technology is fitting.

Anthony Williams and Dan Davis provide the highlights of the mystery. Their Mystery Incorporated is a little off-model in terms of their faces, but they capture their body language superbly. Just look on page four and note the classic Daphne pose. They also emphasize well the humor provided by Shag and Scoob.[1]

Quotes


References