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Trouble in Store

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Expansion This needs a stretch.
Needed: Synopsis.
Trouble in Store
Trouble in Store title card
Description
Part of Scooby-Doo! #82
# of pages 10
Writer Ivan Velez, Jr.
Penciler Robert W. Pope
Inker Jorge Pacheco
Colorer Heroic Age
Letterer Nick J. Napolitano
Editor Joan Hilty
Chronology
Previous story

What a Ghoul Wants

Next story

You'll Never Lurk in This Town Again


Trouble in Store is a story in Scooby-Doo! #82 by DC Comics.

Premise

The gang is hired to flush out the ghost of a minotaur that is haunting a grocery store owned by two brothers.

Synopsis

Insert details here.

Characters

Main characters:

Supporting characters:

Villains:

Other characters:

  • Police officers (single appearance)(no lines)

Locations

  • Beefy Twin Store

Objects

  • TBA

Vehicles

  • None

Suspects

Suspect Motive/reason
Dan Beefy He was physically built like the Minotaur Ghost.

Culprits

Culprit Motive/reason
Joe Beefy as the Minotaur Ghost He turned vegetarian and wanted to keep the store from selling meat.

Notes/trivia

  • TBA

Reception

"Trouble in Store" takes the tone of the Scooby-Doo movie. That's certainly not a complaint. You know where I'll be March 26th. Ivan Velez's characterization of Shaggy resembles the antics of Matt Lillard's Shaggy. Artist Robert Pope with his exaggerated Shaggy body language reinforces this attitude.

Another way this second tale pushes toward the film is that for this mystery, the Gang is put in real danger. Velma in particular could have suffered from the villain's obsessive bent had Shaggy and Scooby not saved her from the cold reception.

The villain of the story exhibits Velez's thought and imagination. He considered how this villain might have plausibly concocted his illusion and came up with some plausible, fascinating cinematic tricks to accomplish the look. Robert Pope aids the writer with a potent, threatening image for the character.

Two solid puzzles for the Gang to solve, an inventive villain and a classic motive entertain with another good issue of Scooby-Doo. [1]

Quotes


References

  1. Ray Tate in Firing Line Reviews

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